Blog Archives

Homeopathy for Alzheimer’s disease

Homeopathic treatment slows progression of Alzheimer’s disease

J. B. Bardot
Natural News
2011 December 16

A huge leap in the natural treatment of Alzheimer’s disease was recently reported at the Neuroscience Conference in Washington by the National Center for Homeopathy. Homeopathic manufacturer and research organization, Heel, presented studies on a multi-target, combination homeopathic medicine that has proven effective for both relieving symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease and influencing the reduction of the formation of amyloid plaques in the brains of patients. In-vitro and in-vivo studies were conducted in France and Finland, and confirm that subjects had enhanced learning abilities, an increase in their ability to recognize objects, and improvement in memory performance after treatment.

Classical homeopathy also offers patients hope. Classical homeopathy uses one remedy at a time, and may take a similar multi-targeted approach to treating Alzheimer’s; however, the practitioner may either alternate or use several remedies in succession rather than giving them together in combination. The announcement from Heel allows people, who would otherwise not seek homeopathic treatment, to feel more confident of its efficacy.

What is Alzheimer’s Disease?

Alzheimer’s is an affliction of the brain causing the gradual deterioration of brain cells that result in the loss of memory, cognitive abilities and intelligence. The disease afflicts primarily the elderly and symptoms are often seen as early as the late 40s. Alzheimer’s is the primary cause of dementia, a decline in brain performance, thinking skills and reasoning. The disease is caused by two abnormalities including neurofibrillary tangles (or bunches of altered proteins inside brain cells) and amyloid plaques (or fragments of proteins forming outside the brain cells).

Full article here

Chemotherapy impairs brain function

New evidence chemotherapy for breast cancer causes brain damage

S. L. Baker
Natural News
2011 November 15

Primary breast cancer (meaning a breast malignancy that hasn’t spread to other parts of the body) isn’t usually thought of as causing neurological problems. After all, if cancer hasn’t spread to the brain, why would it? Researchers have been forced to wonder about the answer to that question because a growing body of evidence over the past several years strongly suggests that women with breast cancer are at increased risk for not only problems with brain function but with actual alterations in their brain structure, too.

It turns out, according to a report just published in the November issue of the Archives of Neurology, that it’s not the cancer but the treatment for breast cancer — specifically chemotherapy — that could be causing a significant amount of the neurological impairment with poor outcomes seen in women with breast cancer.

Shelli R. Kesler, Ph.D., and colleagues at Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, conducted an observational study to investigate whether patterns of brain activation differed between breast cancer survivors who were treated with chemotherapy and those who didn’t have chemo. The research team also compared the brain activity of these breast cancer survivors to the brain activity of healthy women who were cancer-free.

In all, the study involved 25 women with breast cancer who received chemotherapy, 19 women with breast cancer who did not undergo chemotherapy, and 18 healthy female controls. All the research subjects were matched for age and other variables. The women were asked to perform a variety of tasks while the scientists used functional MRIs to measure and document activation in several areas of the women’s brains.

%d bloggers like this: